Archive for ‘Clocks’

Updated Mantle

By , 24 April, 2017, No Comment
New Mantle With Clock

New Mantle With Clock

Shortly after buying our home and moving in nearly six years ago, I discovered that the rough cedar mantle, stained a dark walnut, had been broken and reattached to the stub hanging from the rock wall.  I noticed later that it also had about a half inch lean to the front because of the poor quality of the mend.  I vowed to fix it one day.

This week I took on the project, and finished it today.

Finger Joints With Ebony Plugs

Finger Joints With Ebony Plugs

Last week I found a nice piece of walnut at Midwest Woodworking in Omaha (now Woodcraft) that had a lot of character to it.  I used that to wrap the front and the sides.  The finished product shows many shades of color to it between the sap and heart wood.

Being lovers of the Arts & Crafts style, and Greene & Greene lovers on top of that, the wife and I agreed to use some of the style characteristics from Greene & Greene.  Borrowed from that style are the finger joints, ebony plugs and cloud lifts which can all be seen in the one picture of the left corner.

Cathedral Grain

Cathedral Grain

We also decided to use four 3/8 inch ebony plugs in the front center to make a bit of a statement.  The clock I made for Judy a while back, and the four ebony plugs tie into the four square boxes in the corners of the clock face.

The top was a piece of walnut that I have had for several years that I picked up in St. Joseph, MO.  It has some amazing cathedral and knot grain that won’t be seen much, but it was the right piece.

The wood was sanded to 320 grit and then given several coats of Danish Oil.  It is silky smooth, and easy to care for should it get scratched a bit.

Knot in the Top

Knot in the Top

Previously, the mantle ledge barely held the clock.  It was just wide enough that the top of the clock would not hit the rocks in the wall.  This ledge is nearly two inches wider, which provides the luxury of moving the clock into the center of the top’s width.

Unlike the old mantle which was ugly and not worth a second look, this one has lots of grain and color changes.  Throughout the day, and with different lighting, it seems to change significantly.  At the moment, it is more interesting than the items sitting on top!

I was recently reading Krenov, and he stated that he eventually moved away from woods with lots of figure.  I know he made great sense, but I hope I continue to be able to find places where beautiful figure is appropriate.  It is hard to stop looking at it!

 

 

Beli Wood Arts & Crafts Clock

By , 30 June, 2013, 1 Comment
Front of Arts & Crafts Clock

Front of Arts & Crafts Clock

This Arts & Crafts clock was made for my wife’s birthday.  As usual, I finished it late, but she is happy none the less.

The clock was made from a single plank of Beli (or Bali as marked by the store) wood.  The wood resembles zebra wood in many ways, but is cheaper and does not have the unpleasant odor associated with zebra wood.

This single piece of wood had wonderful grain throughout, but as you look at the pictures, you can see that it varied greatly within the plank.  That one piece looked like plenty before I started, but I cut the plank on a bit of an angle to straighten out the lines a bit.  That left me with a bit less than if I had just begun cutting.

Left Side of the Clock

Left Side of the Clock

I found a couple of complaints about the wood.  First it has row grain, or interlocked which means that it is a bear to use a hand plane.  I got tear-out when I was going with the grain.  Row grain has places where the direction changes in rows or furrows which makes it very challenging to work.  I used card scrapers and fell back on sanding when I knew the risk of taking off just a bit more.

The wood also seems very splintery.  I got a number of little slivers as it seems to be a very stiff, dry wood, a lot like purpleheart if you have used that.  Lastly I consistently got sore throat during sanding.  I thought I had a cold or something the first time.  According to The Wood Database, there should not be any reaction to the wood, but I did experience some.

Right Side of the Clock

Right Side of the Clock

Even though I found the wood challenging to use, I love the way that it looks.  If you go in knowing about the interlocked grain and the other characteristics, you will probably love the overall look too.

I saw this clock on the web, and very much enjoyed the look.  We like Arts & Crafts furniture, and this looked like the perfect addition for our home.  This clock measures 17 inches tall by 15 inches wide by 6 inches deep.  I confess to copying greatly from the pictures.

Of note, I made the clock face using Microsoft Word and a macro that gave me a clock layout.  I put on the numbers and corner squares and then printed it on a fancy heavy paper we found at Office Depot.  The paper is glued to a piece of plywood that had a couple of sanded coats of shellac.

Clamping the Clock Door

Clamping the Clock Door

The clock movement I also picked up locally at Midwest Woodworkers, the place that sold the wood.

This last picture my wife made me take.  I glued the mullions in around the glass, and I used a lot of clamps to make certain that the pieces were all tight and flat.  Like all wood workers, I always need more clamps.  I was pointing out the fact that I need a lot of them for some projects, so she make me take a picture.  After gluing, I laid the door on top of the clock base so that the clamps could hang nicely.