The Corner Cabinet

By , 30 September, 2014, No Comment
Corner Cabinet

Corner Cabinet

My current project involves reworking our home’s cabinets that are original back to 1981.  The current look is extremely dated and not great quality.  Part one of the renovation had been to tear out a set of cabinets hanging from the ceiling that divided the dining room from the kitchen.  Then we removed the lower cabinets and bar.

That alone changed the room completely.  Since then we replaced the flooring in the two rooms with a nice laminate floor, and redid the counter tops.  We closed off the lower counter where the bar formerly tied in with a bookcase and slid the dishwasher in the opening.

Above the counter we made the decision to add a corner cabinet.  This I made some weeks back, and hung it in its spot.  Then I began making the door.

Corner Door with Glass

Corner Door with Glass

Judy and I agreed that the door needed glass and a shape that would set it off.  We were very happy to find some wonderful glass here in Omaha at Rainbow Artistic Glass.   The glass had a lot of beautiful color, texture and design.  Judy carefully picked the exact location for cutting the pieces and we had Rainbow cut it for us.

Here you can see the finished door with the waterfall effect in the glass.  This turned out very nicely and is finished except for finding just the right pull for the door.   Both the door and the cabinet are made of quartersawn white oak.

On the backside I cut muntins to hold the class in.  The easy way would have been to make the muntins join together seamlessly, but I preferred the difference in height that I had seen done traditionally.  So each was hand fitted and rounded to give it that hand crafted look.

Back of Door Showing Muntins

Back of Door Showing Muntins

I hope to have the door hung soon.  The hinges have been fitted and it is ready.  Then I will have a whole lot of other doors with wood panels to cut, fit and hang.

Island Study

By , 22 August, 2014, No Comment
Makenna Studying

Makenna Studying

The island has been in use for some time.  Here my oldest Granddaughter concentrates on homework during an October afternoon.  No doubt this is just the way that Grandma had envisioned when she asked for a recessed area on the side for the grands to sit.

Of course we use it daily.  Our silverware lives in one of the drawers, and we keep other necessary items stored in various places.

We eat breakfast every morning at the island.  There are a number of ways to sit around it, and I typically find myself under the overhang on the end in the mornings.

A lot of activities have taken place with the use of the island.  Our first was Thanksgiving last year, and it has been in constant usage since.  Because it is mobile, Judy moves it around where ever she needs it.  Sometimes it is in the middle of the floor where the grands are snacking and watching a little television.  Sometimes it is against the wall where it serves as a buffet.

But, mostly it sits right where it is in the picture with Makenna.  Could there be anything sweeter to a woodworker than to have something you made for your family becoming a center piece in their lives?

 

The Boxes Go Home

By , 4 July, 2014, No Comment
Giving a box to my brother Bob

Giving a box to my brother Bob

All of the boxes that I made over the winter have now gone home to be with a member of my family.

I had each of my children and their spouses draw numbers so that they could choose from the lot of 7 boxes as their number came around.

As it worked out, my brother Bob and his wife Diane were visiting from Phoenix this past week.  My daughter-in-law made her pick when the wife drove over there with the remaining two boxes.  That left one box for Bob to take home.

It was fun to make the boxes, but even more fun to send them home with family.

 

Cherry With a Curly Maple Top

By , 23 April, 2014, No Comment
Top View

Top View

This box is made of Cherry with a Curly Maple lid and a handle made of Fishtail Oak (or eucalyptus).  The cherry and the fishtail were purchased locally at Midwest Woodworkers here in Omaha.  The curly maple came from a sawmill in St. Joseph, MO.

Open From the Back

Open From the Back

I have made a couple of things from this piece of curly maple.  I liked this particular piece because it has nice curl to it, but also has a nice band of a darker color running along the front of the lid.  This gives it some extra character.  The outside and the inside both show well from any angle.

Inside

Inside

I actually started with the cherry, and picked the maple as a nice complement.  I had planned to build the entire box from cherry, but this piece of maple called out to me.

I had to call in my partner when it came time to choose something for the handle.  I held up nearly a dozen varieties of wood and even more variations with those dozen, but I could not decide.  Judy came down to the shop and we held them all up again.  She picked the one that I had ruled out because I thought it was too busy.

Fishtail Oak Handle

Fishtail Oak Handle

She convinced me that the fishtail cut in the right direction when finished would be just the right look.  I loved the way that the grain swirled around with the shape of the handle.  I think she was right.  The combination of colors and figure looks great.

I don’t make many things from cherry as I seem to go for the heavy figured woods.  But it is such a nice warm wood, and it finishes so well.  It is easy to see why it is a favorite of many people.

Right Side

Right Side

Something new on this box are feet!  I don’t normally put them on, but these were handmade of fishtail.  I took a 3 inch piece that was about 5/8 square, and chucked it into the drill press.  Using files and sandpaper I shaped it and sanded.  I then cut short little stubs about 1/4 inch long and glued them on.  I have not decided yet if I will do that again, but it works on this box.

Once again, I used Deft Danish Oil, and rubbed it down.

The box dimensions are 9 3/8 x 5 1/4 by 3 inches.

This box went home with my daughter-in-law Jill.

 

Figured Walnut Box

By , 18 March, 2014, 1 Comment
Inside The Walnut Box Showing the Figure and Curl

Inside The Walnut Box Showing the Figure and Curl

Even more beautiful than I imagined.  When I picked up these pieces of cut-offs from a pallet in a Phoenix wood store, they were really rough in most cases.  After you have worked with figure for a while, the eye knows when there is beauty below the rough exterior, but you still have to hope it is as nice as you are imagining.  These pieces did not disappoint me.  Read my previous blog for more details about this wood.

View From the Back With Lid Open

View From the Back With Lid Open

Building this box used 4 of the pieces that I brought back from Phoenix.  Honestly, it was painful to cut some of those pieces up, and setting off the remainders.  The discarded parts are just as interesting as the pieces that I used in the box.  I am determined to keep them until I find some use for them.

Top View

Top View

The lid possess an amazing amount of character.  When I laid out the pieces and selected the sides, I was left with a choice of several pieces for the lid.  I liked several, but this one spoke to me the most, and it seemed to fit the power of the body.  The curl became very pronounced once I applied the finish.

Right Side

Right Side

Finding the right piece from my box of leftovers for the handle proved a little challenging.  I looked at other woods and most were too great of a contrast.  I thought a piece of curly maple would be nice, but it looked completely out of place.  It had to be walnut.  With all of the cut-offs that I had, there were a lot to choose from.  What I wanted, I could not find.  I wanted a piece where the sapwood might follow the curve of the handle.  My second pick was a piece where the colors radiated out from the box to the outer edge.  This piece looked nice when I got it shaped and glued on.

Left Side

Left Side

Here are a couple of photos that show the two sides.  Each side really popped once the finish was applied.  I wish that the piece that I used for the right side had been large enough for a lid.  The character of that small portion is fabulous.  Things are going in multiple directions with variations of color and hue overlapping.

Front View With Lid Closed

Front View With Lid Closed

The last photo is a nice view of the front.  This seemed to be the best piece of wood when I saw them in the rough.  Unfortunately, the piece turned out very dark so it is hard to appreciate the beauty of what I was seeing.  But you get the idea.

I used Deft Danish Oil again, and rubbed it down.

The box dimensions are 9 3/8 x 5 3/8 by 2 3/8 inches.

This box went home with my daughter Jenny.